Files:DescriptionFile size FormatBrowse
Fulltext0.99 MBPDF (requires Acrobat Reader)Previous | Next
  
Authors:Richard Pettersson: Umeå University, Sweden
Publication title:The Museum of National Antiquities in Sweden and its national agenda: an overview of the 1900-1970 period
Conference:Great Narratives of the Past Traditions and Revisions in National Museums: Conference Proceedings from EuNaMus; European National Museums: Identity Politics; the Uses of the Past and the European Citizen; Paris 28 June – 1 July & 25–26 November 2011
Publication type: Abstract and Fulltext
Issue:078
Article No.:015
Abstract:How has a national narration been established and reproduced at Sweden’s central museum for Prehistory and the Middle Ages; the Museum of National Antiquities (MNA; today named the National Historical Museum)? The chronological framework for answering this question here relates to the period from 1900 to 1970 with an emphasis on the 1920-50 period; the foundational time of the Swedish Welfare state. During these decades the MNA changed on many levels; including a new building and a new organizational structure; which entailed a change of exhibitions as well. At the same time the museum presents a remarkable continuity with regard to its objectives and agenda.

During most of the 20th century the link between statistically processed object types and ethnographic interpretations was and is a discursive construction. However; the situation between 1900 and 1950 was unique with regard to the MNA exhibitions and the ideological profile of archaeology. What flourished then was an archaeology that might be characterized as nationally romantic; culturally conservative and racial; and one might add that this changed only gradually in the wake of the Second World War. Still; and despite certain sympathizers of Nazi Germany amongst its practitioners; Swedish archaeology cannot be compared to that developed in the context of Nazi ideology. It did not advocate or actively support racial war; euthanasia or aggressive racial hygiene (Baudou 2002). Nevertheless; Swedish archaeology formed part of an international context; where cooperation and correspondence between researchers; not least German ones; were a natural part of the practice. This article provides a brief outline of the theme of national identity and archaeological representation in Sweden; mainly through an interpretation of the displays of the early 20th century in the MNA.

Language:English
Year:2012
No. of pages:23
Pages:229-251
Series:Linköping Electronic Conference Proceedings
ISSN (print):1650-3686
ISSN (online):1650-3740
File:http://www.ep.liu.se/ecp/078/015/ecp12078015.pdf
Available:2012-10-30
Publisher:Linköping University Electronic Press; Linköpings universitet

REFERENCE TO THIS PAGE
Richard Pettersson (2012). The Museum of National Antiquities in Sweden and its national agenda: an overview of the 1900-1970 period, Great Narratives of the Past Traditions and Revisions in National Museums: Conference Proceedings from EuNaMus; European National Museums: Identity Politics; the Uses of the Past and the European Citizen; Paris 28 June – 1 July & 25–26 November 2011 http://www.ep.liu.se/ecp_article/index.en.aspx?issue=078;article=015 (accessed 12/22/2014)