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Title:
Proceedings of LREC 2016 Workshop. Resources and Processing of Linguistic and Extra-Linguistic Data from People with Various Forms of Cognitive/Psychiatric Impairments (RaPID-2016), Monday 23rd of May 2016
Download:
Full text (pdf)
Editor(s):
Dimitrios Kokkinakis: University of Gothenburg, Sweden
Year:
2016
No. of pages:
40
Language:
English
ISBN:
978-91-7685-730-4
Series:
Linköping Electronic Conference Proceedings
Issue:
128
ISSN (print):
1650-3686
ISSN (online):
1650-3740
Published:
2016-06-03
Publisher:
Linköping University Electronic Press, Linköpings universitet



The purpose of the Workshop on “Resources and ProcessIng of linguistic and extra-linguistic Data from people with various forms of cognitive/psychiatric impairments” (RaPID-2016) was to provide a snapshot view of some of the current technological landscape, resources, data samples and also needs and challenges in the area of processing various data from individuals with various types of mental and neurological health impairments and similar conditions at various stages; increase the knowledge, understanding, awareness and ability to achieve useful outcomes in this area and strengthen the collaboration between researchers and workers in the field of clinical/nursing/medical sciences and those in the field of language technology/computational linguistics/Natural Language Processing (NLP).

Although many of the causes of cognitive and neuropsychiatric impairments are difficult to foresee and accurately predict, physicians and clinicians work with a wide range of factors that potentially contribute to such impairments, e.g., traumatic brain injuries, genetic predispositions, side effects of medication, and congenital anomalies. In this context, there is new evidence that the acquisition and processing of linguistic data (e.g., spontaneous story telling) and extra-linguistic and production measures (e.g., eye tracking) could be used as a complement to clinical diagnosis and provide the foundation for future development of objective criteria to be used for identifying progressive decline or degeneration of normal mental and brain functioning.

An important new area of research in NLP emphasizes the processing, analysis, and interpretation of such data and current research in this field, based on linguistic-oriented analysis of text and speech produced by such a population and compared to healthy adults, has shown promising outcomes. This is manifested in early diagnosis and prediction of individuals at risk, the differentiation of individuals with various degrees of severity forms of brain and mental illness, and for the monitoring of the progression of such conditions through the diachronic analysis of language samples or other extralinguistic measurements. Initially, work was based on written data but there is a rapidly growing body of research based on spoken samples and other modalities.

Nevertheless, there remains significant work to be done to arrive at more accurate estimates for prediction purposes in the future and more research is required in order to reliably complement the battery of medical and clinical examinations currently undertaken for the early diagnosis or monitoring of, e.g., neurodegenerative and other brain and mental disorders and accordingly, aid the development of new, non-invasive, time and cost-effective and objective (future) clinical tests in neurology, psychology, and psychiatry.

Papers were invited in all of the areas outlined in the topics of interest below particularly emphasizing multidisciplinary aspects of processing such data and also on the exploitation of results and outcomes and related ethical questions. Specifically, in the call for papers we solicited papers on the following topics:

  • Building and adapting domain relevant linguistic resources, data, and tools, and making them available.
  • Data collection methodologies.
  • Acquisition of novel data samples, e.g. from digital pens (i.e., digital pen strokes) or keylogging and integrating them with data from various sources (i.e., information fusion).
  • Guidelines, annotation schemas, and tools (e.g., for semantic annotation of data sets).
  • Addressing the challenges of representation, including dealing with data sparsity and dimensionality issues, and feature combination from different sources and modalities,
  • Adaptation of standard NLP tools to the domain.
  • Syntactic, semantic, and pragmatic analysis of data, including modelling of perception (e.g., eye-movement measures of reading) and production processes (e.g., recording the writing process with digital pens, keystroke logging, etc.), use of gestures accompanying speech and non-linguistic behaviour.
  • Machine learning approaches for early diagnosis, prediction, monitoring, classification, etc. of various cognitive, psychological, and psychiatric impairments, including unsupervised methods (e.g., distributional semantics).
  • Evaluation of tools, systems, components, metrics, applications, and technologies that make use of NLP in the domain.
  • Evaluation, comparison, and critical assessment of resources.
  • Evaluation of the significance of extracted features.
  • Involvement of medical professionals and patients and ethical questions.
  • Deployment of resources.
  • Experiences, lessons learned, and the future of NLP in the area.

Most of these topics lie at the heart of the papers that were accepted to the workshop which features 6 oral presentations.

We would like to thank all the authors who submitted papers, as well as the members of the Program Committee for the time and effort they contributed in reviewing the papers. We are also grateful to Dr Peter Garrard for accepting to give an invited talk at the workshop entitled: “Neurobehavioural disease signatures in language corpora”.

The Editor



Proceedings of LREC 2016 Workshop. Resources and Processing of Linguistic and Extra-Linguistic Data from People with Various Forms of Cognitive/Psychiatric Impairments (RaPID-2016), Monday 23rd of May 2016

128:001
Kathleen C. Fraser, Graeme Hirst
Detecting semantic changes in Alzheimer’s disease with vector space models
[Abstract and fulltext]

128:002
Christine Howes, Mary Lavelle, Pat Healey, Julian Hough, Rose McCab
Helping hands? Gesture and self-repair in schizophrenia
[Abstract and fulltext]

128:003
Spyridoula Varlokosta, Spyridoula Stamouli, Athanassios Karasimos, Georgios Markopoulos, Maria Kakavoulia, Michaela Nerantzini, Aikaterini Pantoula, Valantis Fyndanis, Alexandra Economou, Athanassios Protopapas
A Greek Corpus of Aphasic Discourse: Collection, Transcription, and Annotation Specifications
[Abstract and fulltext]

128:004
Mariya Khudyakova, Mira Bergelson, Yulia Akinina, Ekaterina Iskra, Svetlana Toldova, Olga Dragoy
Russian CliPS: a Corpus of Narratives by Brain-Damaged Individuals
[Abstract and fulltext]

128:005
Maksim Belousov, Mladen Dinev, Rohan Morris, Natalie Berry, Sandra Bucci, Goran Nenadic
Mining Auditory Hallucinations from Unsolicited Twitter Posts
[Abstract and fulltext]

128:006
Christopher Bull, Dommy Asfiandy, Ann Gledson, Joseph Mellor, Samuel Couth, Gemma Stringer, Paul Rayson, Alistair Sutcliffe, John Keane, Xiaojun Zeng, Alistair Burns, Iracema Leroi, Clive Ballard, Pete Sawyer
Combining data mining and text mining for detection of early stage dementia: the SAMS framework
[Abstract and fulltext]

Proceedings of LREC 2016 Workshop. Resources and Processing of Linguistic and Extra-Linguistic Data from People with Various Forms of Cognitive/Psychiatric Impairments (RaPID-2016), Monday 23rd of May 2016

Author:
Dimitrios Kokkinakis
Title:
Proceedings of LREC 2016 Workshop. Resources and Processing of Linguistic and Extra-Linguistic Data from People with Various Forms of Cognitive/Psychiatric Impairments (RaPID-2016), Monday 23rd of May 2016
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