Article | KEER2014. Proceedings of the 5th Kanesi Engineering and Emotion Research; International Conference; Linköping; Sweden; June 11-13 | Influence of Visual and Pressure Information on Clothing Pressure Sensation Link�ping University Electronic Press Conference Proceedings
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Title:
Influence of Visual and Pressure Information on Clothing Pressure Sensation
Author:
Mayumi Uemæ: Department of Bioscience and Textile Technology, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Technology, Shinshu University, Japan Tomohiro Uemæ: Saku Regional Office (Nagano Prefecture), Japan Masayoshi Kamijo: Department of Bioscience and Textile Technology, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Technology, Shinshu University, Japan
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Full text (pdf)
Year:
2014
Conference:
KEER2014. Proceedings of the 5th Kanesi Engineering and Emotion Research; International Conference; Linköping; Sweden; June 11-13
Issue:
100
Article no.:
018
Pages:
237-244
No. of pages:
8
Publication type:
Abstract and Fulltext
Published:
2014-06-11
ISBN:
978-91-7519-276-5
Series:
Linköping Electronic Conference Proceedings
ISSN (print):
1650-3686
ISSN (online):
1650-3740
Publisher:
Linköping University Electronic Press; Linköpings universitet


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Clothing comfort sensation is composed of multisensory processes and involves complex processes; in which a large number of stimuli from clothing and external environments are communicated to the brain through multiple channels of sensory responses to form subject perceptions. We get much information through visual sensation; so studies on the influences of visual information on clothing pressure sensation is very important. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of clothing pressure on physiological and psychological responses in order to create a method for evaluation of clothing comfort. We have measured physiological and psychological responses in the clothing pressure sensation under 3 visual conditions; Condition 1 was that the subjects had their eyes open and looked forward; Condition 2 was that the subjects looked at themselves in a mirror; and Condition 3 was that the subjects without a waist belt look at other subjects who wore a fastened waist belt. Consequently; in all three conditions; the sympathetic nerve activity decreased. The sympathetic nerve activity decreased also in Condition 3 in which the information of clothing pressure was added through only visual sensation. In the re-rest period; the response in Condition 2 was significantly larger than that in Condition 1 and Condition 3. We concluded that it is important to consider the effects of visual information as well as the effect of clothing pressure sensation in the evaluation of clothing comfort sensation.

Keywords: Clothing pressure sensation; Visual sensation; Multisensory; Physiological responses; Psychological responses

KEER2014. Proceedings of the 5th Kanesi Engineering and Emotion Research; International Conference; Linköping; Sweden; June 11-13

Author:
Mayumi Uemæ, Tomohiro Uemæ, Masayoshi Kamijo
Title:
Influence of Visual and Pressure Information on Clothing Pressure Sensation
References:

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Uemae; M.; Uemae; T.; & Kamijo; M. (in press). Fukubu e no hifukuatsu ga shinshin ni ataeru eikyo to sono heigan kaigan ni okeru hikaku [Differences in psychological and physiological responses by clothing pressure to abdomen in closed eyes and open eyes conditions]. Transactions of Japan Society of Kansei Engineering.

KEER2014. Proceedings of the 5th Kanesi Engineering and Emotion Research; International Conference; Linköping; Sweden; June 11-13

Author:
Mayumi Uemæ, Tomohiro Uemæ, Masayoshi Kamijo
Title:
Influence of Visual and Pressure Information on Clothing Pressure Sensation
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