Article | Proceedings of the Sustaining Everyday Life Conference: April 22–24 2009; Campus Norrköping; Sweden | Going in Dialysis is Time to Live:: Family’s Experiences of Everyday Life with Haemodialysis Treatment

Title:
Going in Dialysis is Time to Live:: Family’s Experiences of Everyday Life with Haemodialysis Treatment
Author:
Kristina Ziegert: School of Social and health Sciences, Halmstad University, Sweden
Download:
Full text (pdf)
Year:
2009
Conference:
Proceedings of the Sustaining Everyday Life Conference: April 22–24 2009; Campus Norrköping; Sweden
Issue:
038
Article no.:
023
Pages:
123-133
No. of pages:
11
Publication type:
Abstract and Fulltext
Published:
2010-11-05
Series:
Linköping Electronic Conference Proceedings
ISSN (print):
1650-3686
ISSN (online):
1650-3740
Publisher:
Linköping University Electronic Press; Linköpings universitet


Time is a central concept when attempting to capture how life develops as results of the interaction between the individual and those in his/her immediate environment. Chronic renal disease such as ESRD with chronic haemodialysis not only shortens life but also places everyday life on a thin line survival paramount. The haemodialysis is also a time-consuming treatment that makes it necessary to carefully plan of everyday life and involves next of kin to a large degree. The aim of this study was to explore the content of time in everyday life as experienced by the next of kin of haemodialysis patients. This study used explorative and descriptive design with a content analysis approach. The interviews; which were conducted in the informants’ homes; lasted 20-60 minutes and were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim in order to not to lose any information. Twenty next of kin were selected purposive with the criterion of having at least one year of experience as a next of kin of a patient on haemodialysis. The content of time in everyday life can be described as follows: fragmented time; vacuous time and uninterrupted time. Conclusion which illustrate how time is minimised and life space contracted for next of kin and their family. They were aware of the prognosis of renal disease and the fact that haemodialysis is life-sustaining treatment; which forced them to live for the moment. It is important to gain insight into how time influences the next of kin’s experiences of everyday life and how this knowledge can be communicated in the nursing science.

Proceedings of the Sustaining Everyday Life Conference: April 22–24 2009; Campus Norrköping; Sweden

Author:
Kristina Ziegert
Title:
Going in Dialysis is Time to Live:: Family’s Experiences of Everyday Life with Haemodialysis Treatment
References:

Aristotle (1941); The basic works of Aristotle. In Physica (McKeon R. eds); Random House; New York.


Berg B.L. (2001); Qualitative Research Methods for the Social Science 4th edn. Allyn and Bacon; Boston.


Benzein E.; Johansson B. & Saveman B-I. (2004); Families home care – a resource or burden? District nurses’ beliefs. Journal of Clinical Nursing 2; 867-875.


Calvin A.O. (2004); Haemodialysis patients and end-of-life decisions: a theory of personal preservation. Journal of Advanced Nursing 5; 558-566.


Charmanz K. (1997); Good Days; Bad Days. The Self in Chronic Illness and Time. Rutgers University Press; New Brunswick; NJ. Craig W.L. (2000); The Tense Less Theory of Time. Kluwer Academic Publishers; Dordrecht.


Davies K. (1996) Capturing women’s lives. A discussion of time and methodological issues. Women’s Studies International Forum 6; 579-588.


Ekstedt; M. & Fagerberg I. (2005); Lived experiences of the time preceding burnout. Journal of Advanced Nursing 1; 59-69.


Ekvall A.; Sivberg B. & Rahm Hallberg IL. (2004); Dimensions of informal care and quality of life among elderly caregivers. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences 3; 239-249.


Hagren B.; Pettersen I-M.; Severinsson E. Lutzen K. & Clyne N. (2001) The haemodialysis machine as a lifeline: experiences of suffering from end-stage renal disease. Journal of Advanced Nursing 2; 196-202.


Ingthorsson R.D. (2002); Time; Persistence and Causality. Dissertation. UmeĂĄ studies in philosophy; UmeĂĄ University.


Jeppson Grassman E. (2001); Time; belonging and adaption. Chronic illness and fuctional disorder in the life cycle perspective. Socialvetenskaplig tidskrift 4; 306-326. (In Swedish).


Jönsson B. (1999); Ten Thoughts about Time. Bromberg; Stockholm. (In Swedish).


Kuuppelomaki M.; Sasaki A.; Yamada K.; Asakawa N. & Shimanouchi S. (2004) Coping strategies of family carers for older relatives in Finland. Journal of Clinical Nursing 13(6). 697-706.


Lincoln Y.S. & Guba E.G. (1985) Naturalistic Inquiry. Sage; Beverly Hills; Calif.


McInerney P. (1993) ;Time and Experience. Temple University Press; Philadelphia.


Nieboer A. P.; Schulz R.; Matthews K. A.; Scheier M. F.; Ormel J. & Lindeberg S. M. (1998) ;Spousal caregivers’ activity restriction and depression: a model for changes over time. Social Science and Medicine 2; 1361-1371.


Novotny H. (1994); Time. The Modern and Postmodern Experience. Polity Press; Cambridge.


Pelletier-Hibbert M. & Sohi P. (2001) Sources of uncertainty and coping strategies used by family members of individuals living with end stage renal disease. Nephrology Nursing Journal 2; 411-419.


Polit D.F. & Beck CT. (2004); Nursing Research; Principles and Methods. 7 ed. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; Philadelphia.


Rolland J.S. (1998); Chronic illness and the family cycle. In The Expanded Family Lifecycle: Individual; Family and Social Perspectives 3rd ed (Carter E.A. & McGoldrick M. Eds.) (1999) Allyn and Bacon; New York; pp 492-511.


SRAU (2004); Swedish Register for Active Uremic Care. Karolinska Institute; Stockholm. (In Swedish).


Swedish Medical Research Council (2000) Ethics Guidelines for the Evaluation of Medical Research. Research Ethics Policy and Organisation in Sweden. MRF-report No. 2. Swedish Medical Research Council; Stockholm.


Waerness K. (2000) ;Who is at Home? Assay about Everyday Life in a Sociological Perspective. Fagbokförlaget; Bergen. (In Norwegian)


White Y. & Grenyer B.F. (1999); The biopsychosocial impact of end-stage renal disease: the experience of dialysis and their partners. Journal of Advanced Nursing 30; 1312-1320.


Ziegert K. & Fridlund B. Conceptions of life situation among next of kin of haemodialysis patients. Journal of Nursing Management 9; 231-239.

Proceedings of the Sustaining Everyday Life Conference: April 22–24 2009; Campus Norrköping; Sweden

Author:
Kristina Ziegert
Title:
Going in Dialysis is Time to Live:: Family’s Experiences of Everyday Life with Haemodialysis Treatment
Note: the following are taken directly from CrossRef
Citations:
No citations available at the moment