Article | Proceedings of the Sustaining Everyday Life Conference: April 22–24 2009; Campus Norrköping; Sweden | Introducing and Developing Practice Theory: Towards a Better Understanding of Household Energy Consumption

Title:
Introducing and Developing Practice Theory: Towards a Better Understanding of Household Energy Consumption
Author:
Kirsten Gram-Hanssen: Danish Building Research Institute, Aalborg University, Denmark
Download:
Full text (pdf)
Year:
2009
Conference:
Proceedings of the Sustaining Everyday Life Conference: April 22–24 2009; Campus Norrköping; Sweden
Issue:
038
Article no.:
006
Pages:
45-57
No. of pages:
13
Publication type:
Abstract and Fulltext
Published:
2010-11-05
Series:
Linköping Electronic Conference Proceedings
ISSN (print):
1650-3686
ISSN (online):
1650-3740
Publisher:
Linköping University Electronic Press; Linköpings universitet


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A household’s energy consumption is an important element of sustainable everyday life. It is therefore relevant to understand and explain the daily routines and use of technology that are intimately linked to energy consumption. This paper introduces a recent practice theory from Schatzki; Reckwitz; and Warde that has been put forward as a promising framework to explain everyday life consumer practices. The practice theory is; however; not a commonly agreed upon theory but is regarded more like an approach or a turn within contemporary social theory. When using practice theory in studies of everyday life; there are several conditions that need further clarification. In this paper; the focus will be on the question of how to include technology in practice theory and how technology contributes to both change and stability in practice. In the paper; Schatzkis practice theory is described in detail and; based on Reckwitz; is afterward extended with discussions of different socio-technical approaches; including appropriation and domestication of technology; transition theory; and scales of technology. The paper discusses practice theory and how it can be used to understand the role of objects and technologies in the constitution and change of routines and practices related to the use of everyday-life technologies; as it is by using these technologies that energy is consumed in the homes.

Proceedings of the Sustaining Everyday Life Conference: April 22–24 2009; Campus Norrköping; Sweden

Author:
Kirsten Gram-Hanssen
Title:
Introducing and Developing Practice Theory: Towards a Better Understanding of Household Energy Consumption
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Proceedings of the Sustaining Everyday Life Conference: April 22–24 2009; Campus Norrköping; Sweden

Author:
Kirsten Gram-Hanssen
Title:
Introducing and Developing Practice Theory: Towards a Better Understanding of Household Energy Consumption
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