Article | Comparing: National Museums; Territories; Nation-Building and Change. NaMu IV; Linköping University; Norrköping; Sweden 18-20 February 2008 | Propaganda in the Museum: Past and Present Representations of Communism in Eastern Europé

Title:
Propaganda in the Museum: Past and Present Representations of Communism in Eastern Europé
Author:
Radostina Sharenkova: Ethnographic Institute and Museum, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Bulgaria
Download:
Full text (pdf)
Year:
2008
Conference:
Comparing: National Museums; Territories; Nation-Building and Change. NaMu IV; Linköping University; Norrköping; Sweden 18-20 February 2008
Issue:
030
Article no.:
005
Pages:
71-81
No. of pages:
11
Publication type:
Abstract and Fulltext
Published:
2008-05-20
Series:
Linköping Electronic Conference Proceedings
ISSN (print):
1650-3686
ISSN (online):
1650-3740
Publisher:
Linköping University Electronic Press; Linköpings universitet


In its lifespan; the national museum as institution has been constantly moving forward in close relation to society; academic disciplines and government politics. The Museum served loyally to nationalism but the totalitarian state transformed it into propaganda tool because the official state ideology needed to be materially proved and visually presented in historical continuity. In this paper I will discuss some possible interpretations of communist ideology in museum environment before and after the fall of the Berlin wall in regard to the social and political context. Subject of research is the construction of the message; its structure; contents and characters.

The text as part of a future research project aims to trace the forms and mechanisms of building the museum representations of communist ideology; the relations between decision-making and concept realization. The research is based on two case studies – the ex-National Museum of Working Class Revolution in Sofia and the Museum of Communism in Prague. They are subject to comparative study; regarding the content; context and authorship of their public presentations.

The study of the narrative structures of both museum exhibitions registers similarities and identifies a possible pattern for their construction. The potential factors influencing the presentation concept and planning could be traced first in curators’ background and political standpoints; in the thematic focus of the museum; in the institutional funding resource and in the social and political climate of the region.

Comparing: National Museums; Territories; Nation-Building and Change. NaMu IV; Linköping University; Norrköping; Sweden 18-20 February 2008

Author:
Radostina Sharenkova
Title:
Propaganda in the Museum: Past and Present Representations of Communism in Eastern Europé
References:

Bennett; T.; (1995); The Birth of the Museum. History; Theory; Politics; London and New York: Routledge.


‘For a richer content of the museum exhibitions devoted to the working class revolutionary movement’ (1965); Museums and monuments of culture; 4; pp. 1-2.


Georgiev; G. (1969); ‘The contribution of the museums to the study of the socialist revolution’s fight to defeat’; Museums and monuments of culture; 3; pp. 6-12.


Georgiev; G. (1970); ‘V. I. Lenin and the Bulgarian working class revolution in our museums’ exhibitions’; Museums and monuments of culture; 2; pp. 6-9.


Georgiev; G. (1970); ‘The interpretation of the Communist Party congresses in our museums’ exhibitions (evaluation and problems)’; Museums and monuments of culture; 4; pp. 21-24.


Georgieva; E.; T. Burova; K. Boychev; Guidebook of the National Museum of Working Class Revolution; Sofia.


‘Greeting from the Central Committee of the Bulgarian Communist Party to the curators’ team of the National Museum of Working Class Revolution in regard to its 25th anniversary’; (1976); Museums and monuments of culture; 1; pp. 1-2.


Jowett; G. S.; V. O’Donnell; (1992); Propaganda and Persuasion; Newbury Park; CA: Sage Publications.


Kisyov; I. (1967); ‘The work of the museums on a higher ideological-political level’; Museums and monuments of culture; 2; pp. 1-3.


Kisyov; Iv. (1979); ‘About the museum exhibitions and the museum profiling’; Museums and monuments of culture; 3; pp. 29-34.


Nelson; R. A. (1996). A Chronology and Glossary of Propaganda in the United States. Westport; CT and London: Greenwood Press.
Propp; V. (1995); Morphology of the Folk Tale; Sofia: Prozorec.


Stoimenov; St. (1966); ’15 years Museum of Working Class Revolution in Bulgaria’; Museums and monuments of culture; 1; pp. 34-48.


Tanev; T. (1973); ‘The Museum of Working Class Revolution in Bulgaria and the September 1923 uprising’; Museums and monuments of culture; 3; pp. 29-32.


The collections of the ex-National Museum of Working Class Revolution. Press release; issued by the National History Museum; September 2005.


Internet


Museum of Communism; Prague; official website; http://www.muzeumkomunismu.cz/ (10.01.2008).


Virtual Museum of Communism; http://www.gmu.edu/departments/economics/bcaplan/museum/ musframe.htm (30.01.2008).


The Museum of Genocide Victims; Vilnius; http://www.genocid.lt/muziejus/en/ (30.01.2008).

Comparing: National Museums; Territories; Nation-Building and Change. NaMu IV; Linköping University; Norrköping; Sweden 18-20 February 2008

Author:
Radostina Sharenkova
Title:
Propaganda in the Museum: Past and Present Representations of Communism in Eastern Europé
Note: the following are taken directly from CrossRef
Citations:
No citations available at the moment