Article | The ESF-LiU Conference Cities and Media: Cultural Perspectives on Urban Identities in a Mediatized World Vadstena; Sweden; 25-29 October; 2006 | The Cultural Identity of Homo Videns in Mediated City Spaces

Title:
The Cultural Identity of Homo Videns in Mediated City Spaces
Author:
Anastasia Deligiaouri: MA in Public Law and Political Science, PhD Candidate in Political Science, Scholar of the State Scholarships Foundation of Greece Zissis Papadimitriou: Faculty of Law, Department of Public Law and Political Science, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
Download:
Full text (pdf)
Year:
2006
Conference:
The ESF-LiU Conference Cities and Media: Cultural Perspectives on Urban Identities in a Mediatized World Vadstena; Sweden; 25-29 October; 2006
Issue:
020
Article no.:
014
Pages:
139–148
No. of pages:
10
Publication type:
Abstract and Fulltext
Published:
2007-03-06
Series:
Linköping Electronic Conference Proceedings
ISSN (print):
1650-3686
ISSN (online):
1650-3740
Publisher:
Linköping University Electronic Press; Linköpings universitet


Contemporary societies are organized under the rules of “mediated” civilization. Steadily we have passed from homo-sapiens who premised rational thinking as his basic principle to “homo – videns” who privileged the sense of vision against the procedure of logical estimation. Media gaining a dominant position in everyday life have managed to accustom interpersonal relationships; social structure and cultural identities to a mediated context where the sense of direct communication and exchange of ideas is almost a lost case. The problem of true communication; of real human relationships is even exaggerated in big cities where people tend to construct their identities and consequently their behavior; according to stereotypes presented in media. Since the notion of time; effectiveness; and speed are extremely important for “visual” citizens the lack of interpersonal communication leads inevitably to an isolated; “self-made” identity that each one of us constructs for himself; letting alone any common cultural experience. “Homo videns” in modern cities is a media product and his only true and common shared identity is this of “common visuality”. As Hans Georg Gadamer has warned us: “From ’readers’ we have become spectators of the world”.

The ESF-LiU Conference Cities and Media: Cultural Perspectives on Urban Identities in a Mediatized World Vadstena; Sweden; 25-29 October; 2006

Author:
Anastasia Deligiaouri, Zissis Papadimitriou
Title:
The Cultural Identity of Homo Videns in Mediated City Spaces
References:

Baudrillard; Jean (1994). Simulacra and Simulation; (transl. by Sheila Faria Glaser); Ann Arbor USA: The University of Michigan Press.


Berger; Peter & Thomas Luckmann (1966). The Social Construction of Reality; Harmondsworth: Penguin.


Borer; Michael Ian (2006). “The Location of Culture: The Urban Culturalist Perspective” in City &Community; 5:2; pp. 173–197.


Dayan; Daniel & Elihu Katz (1992). Media Events. The Live broadcasting of history; Cambridge: Harvard University Press.


Debord; Guy (1995). The society of the spectacle; Zone Books: New York.


Filho; Joao Freire (2004). “The Fate of Literary Culture in the Age of Television Spectacle”; in Journal of Latin American Cultural Studies; Vol.13; 2004; pp. 301–213.


Fukuyama; Francis (2002). Our Posthuman Future: Consequences of the Biotechnology Revolution; New York; NY: Farrar; Straus and Giroux.


Hayles; N. Katharine (1999). How we became Posthuman: Virtual Bodies in Cybernetics; Literature and Informatics; Chicago: University of Chicago Press.


Johnson; Steven (1997). Interface Culture. How new technology transforms the way we create and communicate; Harper San Francisco; USA: Basic Books.


Kress; Gunther & Theo Van Leeuwen (2001). Multimodal Discourse. The modes and media of Contemporary Communication; London: Arnold.


Luhmann; Nicklas (1996/2003). The Reality of Mass Media; (transl. in Greek); Athens: Metexmio.


Marcuse; Herbert (1964/1971). One Dimensional Man; (transl. in Greek); Athens: Papazisis.


Noelle-Neumann; Elizabeth; (1991). “Theory of Public Opinion: The concept of the Spiral of Silence” in Anderson; I. (ed) Communication Yearbook; 14. Newbury Park; CA: Sage; pp. 256–287.


Ortega; Felix (2004). “The New Public Space of Politics”; in International Review of Sociology; Vol. 14; No 2; pp. 209–221.


Papadimitriou; Zissis (2002). Postmodern Deadlocks (Metamoderna Adiexoda; in Greek); Thessaloniki; Greece: Paratiritis publ.


Pepperell; Robert (2003). The Posthuman Condition. Consciousness beyond the brain; Bristol UK; Portland; OR; USA: Intellect.


Poster; Mark (1995). The Second Media Age; UK: Polity Press.


Postman; Neil (1986). Amusing ourselves to death: Public Discourse in the age of show business. New York: Penguin Books .


Reeves; Byron & Clifford Nass (1996). The Media Equation. How people treat computers; television; and New Media like real people and places; CSLI Publications.


Sartori; Giovanni (1998). Homo videns: La Sociedad Teledirigida; Madrid : Taurus.


Stevenson; Deborah (2003). Cities and Urban Culture; Maidenhead; Philadelphia: Open University Press.


Thompson; Gary (1997). Rhetoric through Media; N.J: Allyn and Bacon.


Thompson; John B. (1990) Ideology and Modern Culture. Critical Social Theory in the Era of Mass Communication; Stanford; California: Stanford University Press.


Wellman; Barry & Milena Gulia (1999). “Net surfers don’t ride alone: Virtual Communities as Communities” in Kollock; Peter & Marc Smith (eds) Communities and Cyberspace; New York: Routledge.

The ESF-LiU Conference Cities and Media: Cultural Perspectives on Urban Identities in a Mediatized World Vadstena; Sweden; 25-29 October; 2006

Author:
Anastasia Deligiaouri, Zissis Papadimitriou
Title:
The Cultural Identity of Homo Videns in Mediated City Spaces
Note: the following are taken directly from CrossRef
Citations:
No citations available at the moment